WHAT IS SLEEP APNEA?

Sleep Apnea is a serious medical condition which effects your quality of sleep, health and general wellbeing. An apnea is the interuption of airflow to your lungs, caused buy the relaxed state of the walls and muscels in your airway forming a blockage during sleep. Apneas can occur hundreds of times a night and can last up to a minute during which your body is being deprived of oxygen.

Normal Sleep

No obstruction

Snoring

Partial obstruction of  

the upper airway 

Sleep Apnea

Complete blockage of  

the upper airway 

DON'T IGNORE THE SNORE!

 

NOT EVERONE WHO SNORES HAS SLEEP APNEA, BUT NEARLY EVERYONE WHO HAS SLEEP APNEA SNORES.

 

Sleep Apnea is not just snoring or feeling tired during the day, it is actually a serious medical condition that if left untreated can have devistating effects on your health and quality of life.

 

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and is the most common form of Sleep Apnea. OSA occurs when the walls and muscles of the upper airway (including the tongue, soft palate etc) relax in such a way that they collapse and block the airway during sleep. The subsequent interruption of air supply to the lungs is called an apnea.

ASSOCIATED HEALTH RISKS OF SLEEP APNEA

STROKE

People with Sleep Apnea are 3 times more likely to suffer a stroke. Almost 70% of people who have had a stroke have Sleep Apnea.1

JOB IMPAIRMENT

People with Sleep Apnea are 3 times more likely to suffer a work-related injury or fatalities.9

 

OBESITY

77% of people who are obese (Body Mass Index greater than 30) may have Sleep Apnea.6

 

TYPE 2 DIABETES

58% of patients with Type 2 Diabetes may have Sleep Apnea.5

 

HEART ATTACK

People with Sleep Apnea may have an increased risk of suffering a heart attack.2

 

DEPRESSION

Sleep Apnea doubles the risk of developing depression.7

 

 

HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

50% of people with high blood pressure also may have Sleep Apnea and Sleep Apnea is a common cause of high blood pressure.3 Patients on multiple medications to manage their blood pressure have an 83% chance of having Sleep Apnea.4

MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS

People with Sleep Apnea are 7 times more likely to have a motor vehicle accident.8

 

 

References: 1. Bassetti et al. Sleep apnea in acute cerebrovascular diseases: final report on 128 patients. Sleep 1999;22:217-223. 2. Jose M Marin, Santiago J Carrizo, Eugenio Vicente, Alvar G N Agusti. Long-term cardiovascular outcomes in men with obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea with or without treatment with continuous positive airway pressure: an observational study: Lancet 2005;365:1046–53. 3. Silversberg et al. Treating Obstructive Sleep Apnea Improves Essential Hypertension& Quality of Life. AAFP 2002;65(2):226-236 4. Logan et al. High prevalence of unrecognized sleep apnea in drug-resistant hypertension. J Hypertension 2001;19:2271-2277. 5. Resnick HE, Redline S, Shahar E, et al. Diabetes and sleep disturbances: findings from the Sleep Heart Health Study. Diabetes Care 2003;26:702–709 [PubMed: 12610025]. 6. O'Keefe T. Patterson E. Evidence Supporting Routine Polysomnography Before Bariatric Surgery.Obesity Surgery 2004;14:23-26 7. Paul E. Peppard, PhD; Mariana Szklo-Coxe, PhD; K. Mae Hla, MD; Terry Young, PhD. Longitudinal Association of Sleep-Related Breathing Disorder and Depression. Arch Intern Med 2006;166(16):1709-1715. doi:10.1001/archinte.166.16.1709 8. Naughton M, Pierce R. Sleep apnoea's contribution to the road toll. Aust NZ J Med 1991;21(6):833–834 [PubMed]. 9. Hillman DR; Murphy AS; Antic R et al. The economic cost of sleep disorders. SLEEP2006;29(3):299-305.

SLEEP APNEA

HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE SLEEP APNEA?

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is the most common type of Sleep Apnea.

1 in 4 Australians suffer from this condition.3

The table shows the percentage of Australians who have the condition by age group. As you can see, it affects far more men than women.

Based on a patient base of 78,145 across Australia, the Independent Sleep Physician Cohort (ISPC) shows how instances of Sleep Apnea can increase along with common risk factors. The patients in the sample were assessed for eligibility for a sleep test according to criteria set by the ISPC.

  • Out of 78,145 patients tested, 86% of patients who were obese had sleep apnea, compared to 60% who were in a healthy weight range (BMI between 18.5 – 24.5).

  • The chances of having sleep apnea also increased with other common risk factors:

    • 84% of males tested had sleep apnea

    • 88% of males, over 45 tested had sleep apnea

    • 92% of males, over 45, who were overweight and obese had sleep apnea.1

If you treat your Sleep Apnea you may decrease your risk of suffering a cardiovascular event (stroke or heart attack) by 64% if diagnosed and treated early,2 along with improving an array of other health and lifestyle benefits.

45-55 YEARS                             11%       2.5%

55 YEARS AND OLDER              24%         6%

Population by Age and Sex Aust States and Territories Jun 2005. Adapted from ABS 3201.1 Accessed 27/02/06

References: 1. De-identified ISPC Patient Information (n=78,145) Data on file. 2. Buchner NJ, Sanner BM, Borgel J, Rump LC. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment of mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea reduces cardiovascular risk. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 176:1274-80. Epub 2007 Aug 2. PubMed PMID: 17673692 3. Medical Services Advisory Committee, Public Summary Document, Application No. 1130 – Unattended Sleep Studies in the Diagnosis and Reassessment of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea March 2010. 4. Panossian LA, Avidan AY. Review of sleep disorders. Med Clin North Am. 2009 Mar. 93(2):407-25, ix.

 
 

ARE YOU AT RISK?

BMI > 30

AGED > 50

LARGE TONSILS

LARGE NECK

RECESSEDCHIN

SMALL AIRWAYS

FAMILY HISTORY

DRINK ALCOHOL 

The following risk factors indicate whether you could be at risk of developing, or already have, Sleep Apnea.

Being middle-aged and overweight are the most common risk factors – feeling motivated to act can be a challenge for those who feel tired. Don’t delay being tested – it could be the first step in turning your life around.

Other factors include:

  • Age (the older you get, the more likely you are to have Sleep Apnea)

  • A large neck circumference (greater than 43cm in men and 40cm in women)

  • Narrow upper airway (due to comparatively large tongue or uvula)

  • Recessed chin

  • Family history

  • Large tonsils or adenoids

  • Consumption of alcohol or use of sedatives (which may relax your throat muscles)

 

 

 

80% of people with Sleep Apnea are undiagnosed and remain at risk3

CONTACT US

Unit 5, 10 Bellbowrie Street

Bellbowrie Park Business Centre

Port Macquarie NSW 2444

 

team@mncls.com.au


Tel:  02 6583 6728

Fax: 02 6526 2199

OPENING HOURS:

Mon - Thurs: 9am - 4pm

Friday - 9am - 12 noon

​​Saturday: By Appointment

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